Tag Archives: Goodness of God

St. Justin Popovich: Is there a way out of these innumerable humanistic hells? . . .

Icon of St. Justin Popovich“Is there a way out of these innumerable humanistic hells? Is there resurrection from these innumerable European graves? Is there a remedy for those innumerable deadly sicknesses? There is, there certainly is: repentance. That is the eternal message of the Gospel of the God-Man: “Repentance so that you may know the truth” (2 Tim. 2:25). Otherwise, it is not possible for anyone to believe in the all-saving Gospel of the God-man. “Repent and believe in the Gospel” (Mark 1:15). Repentance before the God-Man is the only medicine for the sin, the unique medicine for all sins, even for the greatest of sins. There is no doubt. Repentance is the medicine even for this, the greatest sin of the papacy, centered in the arrogant dogma of papal infallibility, as it is also for every one of its sins, every humanism individually, and all humanisms together. Yes, yes, yes. From his beloved great sin of infallibility, European “infallible” man, European humanistic man, can only be saved through whole-hearted and all-transforming repentance before the wondrous, all-merciful, all-virtuous Lord Jesus Christ the God-man, the only Savior of the human race from all sins, from each evil, from each hell, from each devil, from each humanistic rationalism, from any of the sins which the human imagination is able to conceive.” Book St Justin Popovich Orthodox Faith and Life in Christ

+ St. Justin Popovich, “Reflections on the Infallibility of European Man,” Orthodox Faith & Life in Christ

St. John of Kronstadt: . . . . though you be sinful beyond measure, still pray. . . .

Icon of St. John of Kronstadt“When you are praying, watch over yourself so that not only your outward man prays, but your inward one also. Though you be sinful beyond measure, still pray. Do not heed the devil’s provocation, craftiness, and despair, but overcome and conquer his wiles. Remember the abyss of the Saviour’s mercy and love to mankind. The devil will represent the Lord’s fact to you as terrible and unmerciful, rejecting your prayer and repentance; but remember the Saviour’s own words, full of every hope and boldness for us: `Him that cometh to Me, I will in no wise cast out’; and `Come unto Me, all ye that labour and are heavy laden’ – with sins and iniquities, and wiles and calumnies of the devil – and I will give you rest.'”

+ St. John of Kronstadt, My Life in Christ

St. Isaac the Syrian: Be a herald of God’s goodness . . .

Icon of St. Isaac the Syrian“Be a herald of God’s goodness, for God rules over you, unworthy though you are; for although your debt to Him is so great, yet He is not seen exacting payment from you, and from the small works you do, He bestows great rewards upon you.”

  — St. Isaac the Syrian, Homily 60

St. John Cassian: The apostle notes four types of prayer . . .

Icon of St. John Cassian“The apostle notes four types of prayer. ‘My advice is that first of all supplication should be offered up for everyone, prayers, pleas, and thanksgiving’ (I Tim. 2:1)… A supplication is a plea or petition made on account of present and past sin by someone who is moved by contrition to seek pardon. In prayers we offer or promise something to God. The Greek term means ‘vow’… Third comes pleas. We usually make them for others when we ourselves are deeply moved in spirit. We offer them for those dear to us or when we beg for peace in the world… Fourth are thanksgivings. Unspeakably moved by the memory of God’s past kindnesses, by the vision of what He now grants or by all that He holds out as a future reward to those who love Him, the mind gives thanks. In this perspective richer prayers are often uttered. Looking with purest gaze at the rewards promised to the saints, our spirit is moved by measureless joy to pour out wordless thanksgiving to God.”

— St. John Cassian (The Conferences, Conf. Nine sects. 9, 11, 12, 13, 14)

St. Gregory Palamas: Prayer changes from entreaty to thanksgiving . . .

Icon of St. Gregory Palamas“Prayer changes from entreaty to thanksgiving, and meditation on the divine truths of faith fills the heart with a sense of jubilation and unimpeachable hope. This hope is a foretaste of future blessings, of which the soul even now receives direct experience, and so it comes to know in part the surpassing richness of God’s bounty, in accordance with the Psalmist’s words, ‘Taste and know that the Lord is bountiful’ (Ps. 34:8). For He is the jubilation of the righteous, the joy of the upright, the gladness of the humble, and the solace of those who grieve because of Him.”

–St. Gregory Palamas, The Philokalia Vol. 4

St. Dorotheos of Gaza: It is God, Who is merciful and grants everyone what he needs . . .

Icon of St. Dorotheos of Gaza“It is God, Who is merciful and grants everyone what he needs, Who is building him up when He gives him more than he needs; in doing so He shows the abundance of His love for men and teaches him to give thanks. When He does not grant him what he needs, He makes him compensate for the thing he needs through the working of the mind and teaches him patience.”

— St. Dorotheos of Gaza, Discourses and Sayings

St. Nikolaj Velimirovic: For if God does not for a moment tire . . .

Icon of St. Nikolai Velimirovich“For if God does not for a moment tire of giving us good things, how can we tire of thanking Him for these good things?”

— St. Nikolaj Velimirovic

St. Seraphim of Sarov: Excessive care about worldly matters . . .

Icon of St. Seraphim of Sarov“Excessive care about worldly matters is characteristic of an unbelieving and fainthearted person, and woe to us, if, in taking care of ourselves, we do not use as our foundation our faith in God, who cares for us! If we do not attribute visible blessings to Him, which we use in this life, then how can we expect those blessings from Him which are promised in the future? We will not be of such little faith. By the words of our Savior, it is better first to seek the Kingdom of God, for the rest shall be added unto us (see Mt. 6:33).”

— St. Seraphim of Sarov

St. Mark the Ascetic: Everything good is given by the Lord . . .

Icon of St. Mark the Ascetic“Everything good is given by the Lord providentially; and he who has faith that this is so will not lose what he has been given.”

— St. Mark the Ascetic

St. Cyril of Jerusalem: Your accumulated offenses do not surpass . . .

Confession 4God is loving to man, and loving in no small measure. For say not, I have committed fornication and adultery: I have done dreadful things, and not once only, but often: will He forgive? Will He grant pardon? Hear what the Psalmist says: How great is the multitude of Your goodness, O Lord!

Your accumulated offenses surpass not the multitude of God’s mercies: your wounds surpass not the great Physician’s skill. Only give yourself up in faith: tell the Physician your ailment: say thou also, like David: I said, I will confess me my sin unto the Lord: and the same shall be done in your case, which he says immediately: And you forgave the wickedness of my heart. Book Catechetical Lectures of St. Cyril of Jerusalem

+ St. Cyril of Jerusalem, 2.6, Catechetical Lectures

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